Official Naming Ceremony Held on June 29, 2011

 

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A rare, white, non-albino, male buffalo calf born on a Greenville, Texas ranch and considered sacred by Native Americans will be named and dedicated in ceremonies slated for June 29th . 

The public dedication portion of the event will begin promptly at 9AM at the Lakota Buffalo Ranch at 2888 Highway 380 in Greenville Texas, and will include gourd dancing, traditional drum ceremonies, and Native American arts and craft vendors, as well as food Lakota Ranch -Naming Ceremonyvendors. Greenville is approximately 45 miles east of Dallas on Interstate 30, or 30 miles west of McKinney on US Hwy. 380.

Arby Little Soldier, great-great-great grandson of Sitting Bull, said that the birth of a white buffalo is a one-in-ten-million occurrence, and fills a prophecy that has lived in the hearts of many Native Americans for centuries.  The calf will be named Lightning Medicine Cloud in recognition of the circumstances of his arrival, and is highly guarded by both the War Chiefs stationed at the ranch, and the buffalo themselves.  Buffalo are aggressive animals, and have demonstrated unusual protective behavior toward this calf, circling around him when anyone, even Arby Little Soldier, comes near. 

An estimated 5,000 Native Americans and heritage tourists are expected for the event in recognition of its spiritual significance.  A pilgrimage walk will allow all visitors an opportunity to view the buffalo through the July 4th weekend.

There is no admission charge to the event, but an honor gift to the calf is traditional and customary. Pets, alcohol, and firearms are strictly forbidden on the property. Seating will be limited, and visitors are encouraged to bring their own seating and shade.  Parking at the ranch will be available at $5 per car.  Shuttle bus service directly to the event entrance will also be available starting at 7:30 a.m., with buses boarding at the Greenville Farmer’s Market, 2200 Lee Street. Round-trip bus fare is $3, and plans include a tour guide who will explain the history and significance of the white buffalo in route to the ranch, which is 5.6 miles west on US Hwy 380.

Campers and RVs are also welcome to the Lakota Ranch for this special event and may arrive as early as Monday, June 27th after 9 AM. No campers will be allowed to enter for set-up on June 29th until after 3 PM. In addition, campers and RVs must vacate by noon on July 1st.

The white buffalo has long been sacred to the Lakota as well as other Plains tribes, such as the Kiowa, Apache, Cheyenne, Hidatsa, and Pawnee. They believe that man’s survival as a people depends on heeding the white buffalo’s sacred message, which urges man to live with the understanding that all living beings are linked and interdependent. The white buffalo is considered a warning by the Lakota, but it is also a chance for all people to collectively focus their energy on the peaceful, healthy, harmonious world that the buffalo is urging us to create.

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